New resident spotlight: Mildred Dowling

Mildred Dowling

Mildred Dowling

She may be new to Fulton Presbyterian Manor, but it’s certainly not new to her. Mildred Dowling joined our family in January 2018, but her father, Judge Oscar A. Kamp, was with us from 1982-1988.

“I chose Fulton Presbyterian Manor over other area options partly because I was familiar with it, and partly because I really like the levels of care they offer here. If you get really ill, you don’t always have to be rushed to the hospital or to another place,” said Mildred.

Mildred knows first-hand what kind of dilemma that can be, after her husband went through a similar experience several years ago. read more

5 lessons from the oldest old

Photo cedit: Adobe Stock

By Robert DiGiacomo

New York Times reporter John Leland thought he knew how to write about the “oldest old” — people 85 and up. For a proposed year-long series, he figured he would chronicle a laundry list of their issues: things like the dangers of falling, financial pressures and family conflict.

As Leland delved deeper, however, he realized the people in this age group were more than the sum of their problems. And he saw how much he didn’t know about the realities of aging. The resulting “85 & Up” series took a more holistic view of their lives. “I thought aging was about decline and loss,” he told Next Avenue. “I found the problems, but none of the people defined themselves by that.” read more

Learn more about Jessica Donelson and Chas Cramer

Jessica Donelson and Chas Cramer

Jessica Donelson and Chas Cramer

While they’re fairly new to Fulton Presbyterian Manor (within the past six months), Jessica Donelson and Chas Cramer bring with them a wealth of knowledge and experience in their prospective fields.

Jessica is the new health services director and previously worked at ConAgra Brands as the occupational health nurse/manager/safety specialist. She attended North Central Missouri College where she earned her Associates of Applied Science Degree in Nursing and is certified as a Registered Nurse. read more

The Right Ingredients for Independent Living

Doty & Wally Peck

Doty & Wally Peck

When Doty and Wally Peck started their search for an independent living community, they knew it had to have the right mix of amenities and affordability. And after looking at several communities, both in Columbia and Jefferson City, they decided to stay right at home in Fulton.

“We wanted to stay in this community. And here, you can rent your apartment rather than having to buy one,” said Wally.

“They were all nice, but this was the best,” Doty added.

A staff connection helped seal the deal. read more

Tell Your Doctor What’s on Your Bucket List

It’ll help direct your health where you want it to go. [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Grace Birnstengel for Next Avenue

Your doctor can’t read your mind. A doctor assumes everyone wants to live and continue to live the best, healthiest, happiest life possible — but that means something different for everyone. If your doctor knows about your long-term goals and “bucket list” items, however, that can be used to direct your health plan and goals.

Dr. VJ Periyakoil, an internist, geriatrician and palliative care professional at Stanford Health Care wrote a piece for the New York Times about how she regularly asks her patients about their bucket lists. read more

5 Life Lessons From Stephen Hawking

As his death is met with grief, we remember his wisdom. [Photo credit: hawking.org.uk]

By Bryce Kirchoff for Next Avenue

As the passing of renowned physicist and public intellectual Stephen Hawking is met with grief and remembrance the world over, Next Avenue wanted to honor the man who educated the world on a host of issues by sharing five important lessons we learned from him:

1. Trust in science, but remember that we haven’t uncovered all its mysteries yet.

At 22, Professor Hawking was diagnosed with a rare form of motor neuron disease and told he only had a few years to live. For most of his adult life, he was wheelchair bound and could speak only with the aid of a vocal synthesizer. Yet, against all odds, Hawking had a successful career and rich family life until passing away at the age of 76. read more

One Surprising Way Older Adults Can Get Healthier

You know about the obvious things. Now try this. [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Dr. Ann Hwang for Next Avenue

Whether or not we actually do the right things to improve our health, many of us probably assume we know what they are. Walk more. Quit smoking. Eat healthier.

It’s a familiar list, and a good one. As a primary care doctor, I spend plenty of time counseling people to do exactly these things. But here’s another, less familiar thing I think you should consider: get engaged in your community.

The Benefits of Connection

Civic engagement may not be on the top of everyone’s to-do list, but it probably should be. There is intriguing evidence to suggest that people who are engaged in their communities — through activities like participating in local organizations or volunteering — could also have better health. read more

Are You Doing Doctor Appointments Right?

[Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Grace Birnstengel for Next Avenue

Navigating the medical system can be a daunting process. It’s challenging enough to find any doctor with openings, let alone a good doctor. And the internet isn’t always much help.

What is helpful, however, is this in-depth guide to having a good doctor’s appointment written for The New York Times by Dr. Danielle Ofri, author and associate professor of medicine at New York University.

“As a doctor I often get asked by friends and family how to make the most of a medical visit,” she wrote. read more

7 Reasons Why You Should Travel

Reap the benefits of health, happiness and gratitude on your next journey. [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Wendy Sue Knecht for Next Avenue

Some people are just lucky — they’re born with it. I’m not talking about good looks or money. I’m talking about wanderlust …. that something inside of you that just makes you want to go places, explore and of course, wander.

My own wanderlust was cultivated at a young age. Although my family never took anything but road trips growing up, my father used to regale me with bedtime stories of Gee Gee Go-Go, a fictional character who traveled all over the world on his tricycle. It’s no surprise I became a Pan Am flight attendant! read more

Are You Being Helpful or Ageist for People with Dementia?

Offers of support may be perceived as bias. [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Denise Logeland for Next Avenue

A few years ago, Angela Lunde, a leader in patient and caregiver education for the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center in Rochester, Minn., sat at a table between two people who live on opposite sides of a dilemma.

On one side of Lunde was a man with early- to mid-stage Alzheimer’s disease. “He said, ‘What I really want from my community is I want somebody to feel comfortable coming up to me when I’m out and about and asking me if I need help’ if he looked confused,” Lunde recalled. read more