Monthly Archives: December 2017

The Long-Term Care Benefit Many Veterans Are Missing Out On

How to find out if you or your spouse qualify for this long-term care benefit [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Joan Lunden for Next Avenue

When my mom’s dementia no longer made it possible for her to live alone, I began searching for an assisted living community. After I started working with an adviser from A Place for Mom — the senior-living referral service where I’m now a spokeswoman — I learned that my mother was eligible to receive Veterans Administration (VA) benefits that would help offset the costs of her care.

My mother had remarried a man who was a World War II veteran (my dad died in a tragic plane crash when I was 13). I had no idea that as the widow of a veteran there was this kind of financial assistance. read more

Fulton Presbyterian Manor’s Art is Ageless® call for entries underway

Fulton Presbyterian Manor has issued a call for entries for the Art is Ageless® juried exhibit to be held February 21-23, 2018. Entries of artistic works will be accepted from any area artist who is 65 years of age or older to exhibit and/or compete for an opportunity to be featured in the 2019 Art is Ageless calendar.

Artists may choose to enter the exhibit only. For the competition, works are to have been completed in the past five years (since January 2013). There are nine categories, as well as designations of amateur or professional. Works to be entered for judging need to be at Presbyterian Manor by February 19. read more

Will New Design Trends Lessen the Stigma of Hearing Aids?

Photo of new hearing aid

More wireless devices and new looks are changing the world of hearing aids [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Steve Outing for Next Avenue

Have you noticed that more people are putting wireless electronic devices in, or on, their ears? This significant trend has grown, in part, by Apple’s decision to make its latest iPhones without headphone jacks. This got me thinking: What implications does this have for those of us who wear hearing aids?

  • Will there be less-expensive consumer devices available to address hearing impairment and will they look different from expensive traditional hearing aids?
  • Will the stigma of wearing hearing aids lessen or even go away, so wearing hearing aids will be akin to wearing eyeglasses (in other words, no big deal)?

Less Expensive Options for Hearing Aids

To address that first question, a change is coming for hearing-impaired people in the U.S. thanks to a law signed by President Trump in August that will let consumers purchase hearing aids without going through a licensed audiologist. Non-medical technology companies soon will be able to sell low-cost devices that address mild to moderate hearing impairment and market them as hearing aids. read more

Fulton Presbyterian Manor’s Art is Ageless® call for entries underway

Fulton Presbyterian Manor has issued a call for entries for the Art is Ageless® juried exhibit to be held February 21-23, 2018. Entries of artistic works will be accepted from any area artist who is 65 years of age or older to exhibit and/or compete for an opportunity to be featured in the 2019 Art is Ageless calendar.

Artists may choose to enter the exhibit only. For the competition, works are to have been completed in the past five years (since January 2013). There are nine categories, as well as designations of amateur or professional. Works to be entered for judging need to be at Presbyterian Manor by February 19. read more

PATH program brings progress and peace of mind

The O’Rourkes feel at home in the PATH rehabilitation program.

Earl and Pat O’Rourke are well-known figures in the Fulton community, and they have touched many lives through their work and community involvement. So when Earl had a stroke in August, his family turned to Fulton Presbyterian Manor’s PATH® (Post Acute to Home) rehabilitation program. He was completely paralyzed on his left side. Earl spent a week at Boone Hospital, then another four weeks at Rusk Rehabilitation for acute therapy. Once he came to Fulton Presbyterian Manor, he felt at “home.” read more

7 Ways to Eliminate Stereotypes About Aging

Graphic shows elderly man in an armchair, remote in hand, watching TV

An Influencer in Aging on how active intention can do it [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By George H. Schofield, Ph.D. for Next Avenue

(Next Avenue invited our 2017 Influencers in Aging to blog about the one thing they would like to change about aging in America. One of the posts is below; we will be publishing others regularly.)

When Next Avenue named its 2017 Influencers in Aging, a group I’m proud to be in, the site asked us: If you could change one thing about Aging in America, what would it be?

My answer was: Eliminate stereotypes. We are all pioneers, crossing shifting/surprising terrain. Longevity is an individual and collective gift. High quality of life relies on what we actively do with what we’ve got or can create. The catalyst isn’t age. It’s active intention. read more

Medicare, Medicaid and Long-Term Care: Your Questions Answered

A senior woman and a healthcare professional have a pleasant conversation in a senior living setting

Long-term care costs the federal programs do and don’t pay for [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Richard Eisenberg for Next Avenue

Next Avenue recently asked readers to send us their questions about Medicare, Medicaid and long-term care coverage. The most popular ones:

  • What is offered by Medicare and Medicaid for long-term care?
  • If my assets are too high, should I forget about Medicaid?
  • Why does Medicare coverage only pay for skilled care?

Today, we’ll answer those questions.

This topic is weighing heavily on the minds of many Americans, and for two good reasons: 70 percent of people 65 and older will need some kind of long-term care eventually and long-term care costs are astronomical. The median annual fee for a private room in a nursing home, for instance, is $97,455 and hiring a home health aide runs roughly $49,000 a year, according to the 2017 Genworth Cost of Care Report. read more

How to Make the Most of Your Holidays

Happy family exchanging wrapped gifts

Tips and inspiration to keep the season low on stress and high on meaning [Photo credit: Getty Images]

By Heidi Raschke for Next Avenue

From gifts that are truly meaningful to tips on navigating tricky family situations, we’ve got advice and inspiration from the Next Avenue stories below to help you have truly happy holidays:

Traditions and Family

Four Jews and a Christmas Tree — I grew up in a Jewish household where Christmas dawned each year with only one thought in mind: “Woo-hoo, the ski slopes will be empty today!” As my mother made clear, the trees, the ornaments, the music — that wasn’t for us. That was for the family one street over, who (charitably) let my three siblings and me come over each year to help decorate their tree. If our line of menorahs seemed less festive, well, we knew where Mom stood on the idea of a “Hanukkah bush.” Then came love. Then came marriage. Then came the Christmas trees Mom had disparaged. Read more. read more

Fulton Presbyterian Manor honored for achievements

Dawn Smith, executive director of Fulton Presbyterian Manor, with Bruce Shogren (left), president and CEO of PMMA, and Bill Taylor (right), COO of PMMA

Fulton Presbyterian Manor received a certificate of recognition from Presbyterian Manors of Mid-America for reaching goals in fiscal year 2017, covering the months of July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2017.

The recognition came through PMMA’s new Emerald Awards Program, designed to encourage its 17 locations and 2 hospices to achieve high levels of resident and employee satisfaction, meet financial goals, build philanthropic support for the organization’s mission and meet marketing goals. There are 11 areas measured for the Emerald Awards. read more

4 Ways to Maintain Healthy Family Relationships

Deploy a little patience this holiday season [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

By Ken Druck for Next Avenue

(Editor’s note: This essay is the latest in a series from author and speaker Ken Druck, based on work in his book Courageous Aging, which is about how all people can make peace with, and find joy in, every stage of life.)

Things don’t stay the same as we get older. We evolve into the older versions of ourselves.

The same happens with families. And sometimes growing older can cause great upheaval to the family dynamics — especially between adult children and aging parents — requiring additional patience and understanding if we want to age together in a way that is healthy. read more